Fan S. Noli Beethoven and French Revolution – Beethoven the self-taught

According to the legend, the hero never goes to school and has no diploma or degree from any institution of learning. The hero gets his learning from his Divine Father by revelation or any other miraculous process which happily excludes prosaic quizzes, exams, reports, theses and dissertations. In this respect Beethoven was an ideal hero and gave no difficult problem to the hero-worshipers. He fitted exactly into the particular article of faith dealing with the hero’s education. According t Schindler, “Beethoven’s education was neither particularly neglected nor particularly good; he received elementary instruction and learned something of Lain at a public school.»[1] From what Schindler says in his usual  diplomatic and soft-pedal fashion, it appears clearly that the master’s education was not goo at all or to put it till better, Beethoven had no education that is worth mentioning.

According to the legend, the hero never goes to school and has no diploma or degree from any institution of learning. The hero gets his learning from his Divine Father by revelation or any other miraculous process which happily excludes prosaic quizzes, exams, reports, theses and dissertations. In this respect Beethoven was an ideal hero and gave no difficult problem to the hero-worshipers. He fitted exactly into the particular article of faith dealing with the hero’s education. According t Schindler, “Beethoven’s education was neither particularly neglected nor particularly good; he received elementary instruction and learned something of Lain at a public school.»[1] From what Schindler says in his usual  diplomatic and soft-pedal fashion, it appears clearly that the master’s education was not goo at all or to put it till better, Beethoven had no education that is worth mentioning.

His illegible scribbling is that of an Illiterate[2] and he was pathetically helpless in arithmetic. In the Conversation Books we have examples of wrong additions. But he tried to perfect his knowledge in that field because we find an entry in the Conversation Books in Beethoven’s handwriting: “Fr. Konig, The Easiest Method of Teaching Arithmetic to Children in a Pleasant Way, Revised Edition in two parts, 8 Prag, 4 florins and 30 Kreuzer.»[3] The child that expected to learn arithmetic from Fr. König’s book was Beethoven himself at the age of forty-nine. Unfortunately, he did net progress very much in that subject. On his deathbed he had just reached the chapter on multiplication. His nephew Karl explains to him in the Conversation Books that “Multiplication is a simplified form of addition”[4] Exactly like Socrates who, in his death cell shortly before he drank the hemlock, had heroically started the study of music in accordance with a peremptory order given to him by Apollo in a dream.

[1] Schindler-Moscheles, 1841, I. pp.27-28

[2] .”Gestern brachte ich einen Brief auf die Post wo man mich fragte wo der Brief soll? -Ich sehe daher dass meine Schrift vielleicht ebenso oft als ich selbst missdeutet werde.» -Letter to Zmeskall, Oct. 9, 1813, Kastne -Kapp, p. 257.

[3] Fr. Kon ig, Die Leichte t Art den Kindern das R chnen auf eine angen hme Art betzubrlngen e c. etc., verb !’sertp Aufla e, 8 Prag, 4. fl., xn Kreuzer. -Conversation Books. M rch-May. 1819. Blatt lOb, p. 101.

[4] Thayer, English Edition, III, p. 277. 54 55

[1] Schindler-Moscheles, 1841, I. pp.27-28

Opusalb

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Subscribe
No Thanks
Thanks for signing up. You must confirm your email address before we can send you. Please check your email and follow the instructions.
We respect your privacy. Your information is safe and will never be shared.
Don't miss out. Subscribe today.
×
×
WordPress Popup
error: Sorry! You don\'t copy...